23. March 2020 · Comments Off on Five Element Qigong · Categories: Acupuncture, chinese medicine · Tags:

A therapeutic form of exercises emanating from the Taoist philosophy of theFive Elements, Five Element qigong is a unique form of healing especially designed for professional holistic therapists, Chinese Medicine practitioners (like acupuncturists vancouver), healers, somatic-based psychotherapists, and bodyworkers who directly work with patients. The movements can be learned by both the patient and practitioner and is used as part of a treatment plan, or recommended as “homework” for the patient to boost his or her healing processes on a spiritual and physical level. Certain qualifications are considered to see if a practitioner is eligible to practice medical qigong within their clinical discipline.

Pronounced “chee gung,” qigong is a set of simple energetic practices, massages, and tai chi-style movements that can help improve the balance and flow of energy of the body. Rather than using a continuous progression from one position to the next, as happens in tai chi, the movements in qigong are discrete and simple, often trimmed down to a stationary meditative pose or a repetitive pattern.

When one practices five-element qigong regularly, with mindful awareness and conscious breathing, it can stimulate the body’s innate healing powers of the body and promote the smooth flow of energy all across the body. Because of its regenerative qualities, qigong combined with health maintenance practices can be especially valuable for people suffering from spiritual/emotional imbalances, energy blockages, injuries, or severe or minor illnesses. The basic distinct movements are quite easy to learn and perform and with a modest investment of time, can provide a person with additional and incredible holistic benefits.

20. November 2019 · Comments Off on Qigong Can Dramatically Change Your Life In A Good Way · Categories: chinese medicine · Tags:

Qigong is a branch of Traditional Chinese Medication and is used as a form of therapeutic and preventive health care. Qi is known as the life force of the body that helps maintain and strengthen life. Qigong physically trains a person to exercise and control his energy for his own good and if he becomes an expert qigong practitioner, he can even manipulate his qi to treat others.

Qigong is based on Taoist philosophy and has two forms called “hard” and “soft” qigong. One example of hard qigong is the very popular Shaolin kungfu. Tai chi is an example of “Soft” qigong, which also known as inner qigong.

Medical qigong is another aspect of qigong that involves meditation combined with exercises. The objective of qi exercises is to bring the practitioner to a state of meditation. Anxiety and despair are driven away during meditation. Great confidence combined with healthy thinking is affirmed. Focus is readily attained. This exercise will lead to the person gaining control of his body which then results in good feelings about his or her life. In turn, the flow of qi and blood will increase in his body.

Exercise is vital for patients and any age group who desire to attain good health and a peaceful mind. Qigong is very effective in the treatment of physical and mental stress. It allows people to gain increased amounts of stamina and energy, and helps slow down the aging process. However, it won’t work in medical emergencies and in the treatment of acute illness. It is however, effective in treating or preventing chronic disease, disabilities, and conditions.

The first World Conference for Qigong Medical Research was held Beijing, China in 1988. This was later followed by a series of conferences held in New York City, Berkeley, and Tokyo. This was the time when medical researchers, physiologists, and psychologists began to study qigong as an alternative form of treatment for health problems. To promote qigong exercise to other people, several qigong organizations have been established outside of China.

Qigong bolsters the mechanisms that help improve bowel movement, relieve stress, and the delivery of oxygen to the cells. Chinese physicians have utilized qigong in their clinics and hospitals to address the suffering of individuals from a range of ailments. These include arthritis, allergies, bowel problems, asthma, diabetes, constipation, gout, gastritis, heart disease, headaches and high blood pressure. The list is quite extensive and include among others liver disease, chronic kidney disease, myopia, lower back pain, neurasthenia, obesity, retinopathy, paralysis caused by external injury, sciatic neuralgia, rheumatism, stress, sleeplessness, peripheral vascular disease and ulcers.

Qigong is now used to treat cancer symptoms and eliminate or alleviate the side effects of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. It works well in the treatment of cerebral palsy, aphasia, Parkinson disease multiple sclerosis, and post-stroke syndrome as well in the treatment of all sorts of chronic disorders of the respiratory, digestive, nervous and cardiovascular systems and of chronic pain.

This ancient healing art can practically help combat any type of illness. It helps strengthen patients’ inner energy thereby increasing their chance to survive from many illnesses, which Western physicians may deem untreatable.

But as with any other therapy, qigong needs to be trained and learned under the supervision of a licensed Chinese medical physician. Beginners require help from a qigong practitioner or doctor who are willing to offer proper guidance and advice. Qigong requires persistence and discipline to attain desired results.

Ni Nan Gilbert is a licensed acupuncturist in Bellmore, NY with certification in Chinese Herbology and over 16 years experience in traditional Chinese medicine.

07. November 2019 · Comments Off on Qigong, Tai Chi And Abdominal Breathing · Categories: Uncategorized · Tags: ,

Do you swim? Do you sing? Maybe, you do swim or sing or you do both. But what does this have to do with Tai Chi?

Well, let’s examine them one at a time…

Swimming

If you know how to swim, you surely know how to float and you need to breathe deeply whenever you submerge yourself under water and you breathe with your stomach.

Being able to float and breathing through your stomach are some of the first things that your swimming instructor would have taught you.

Sure there are people who know how to swim who don’t breathe into their stomach. They still can swim though, but probably with a bit more effort.

Singing

For a lot of people, singing is purely for entertainment and fun. But if your parents or you hire a teacher so that you can sing like a nightingale, you’ll be taught the proper way of projecting your voice and to breathe properly using your diaphragm or stomach.

This is the way you can increase the strength, power, and versatility into your singing. The muscles in your stomach are stronger than the muscles in your throat. Hence, by breathing through your stomach, you’ll have better vocal control and be able to ‘throw out’ or ‘project’ your voice.

Connecting these two to Qigong & Tai Chi

There’s one thing in common that Qigong, martial art, yoga, and meditation have with Tai Chi: All these practices focus on your breathing, and once again – they instruct you to breathe with your stomach.

Breathing with your stomach is called abdominal breathing.

Actually, one can perform Tai Chi or any passive exercise without worrying about how they breathe. But what they’re doing is depriving themselves of the maximum benefits that they can gain from practicing these exercises.

Qigong and Tai Chi are basically the same. Qi translates to energy or air in English … and air here pertains to your breathing. Therefore, the key to all these practices is abdominal breathing or simply the proper way to breathe.

So the common denominator to swimming, singing, and Tai Chi is abdominal breathing in order to derive the greatest benefits and effects.

But what does abdominal breathing has to do with me if I don’t swim, sing or practice Tai Chi?

Well, if you want to be healthy, stay healthy, increase your health, and live a healthy life, breathing through your stomach can help you inhale more oxygen into your blood increasing the amount of energy and oxygen to your cells which in turn makes your body stronger and healthier.

In Qigong and tai chi, the most important aspect of these practices is your breathing, abdominal breathing to be exact.

In other words, if you practice Qigong or Tai Chi, you’ll merely get the least benefits without breathing properly.

As mentioned a short while ago, breathing through your stomach can help you inhale more oxygen into your blood increasing the amount of energy and oxygen to your cells. And you’ll achieve this even without performing Qigong or Tai Chi although you’ll get a wider range of health benefits if you practice these two relaxing exercises.

It’s not too late to adjust your breathing pattern. You can do it anytime and still reap the benefits of proper breathing.

Abdominal breathing will help you stay as healthy as possible although we would recommend also doing Qigong or Tai Chi for even greater benefits.

It will be easy to concentrate, focus, and be alert at all times by simply performing abdominal breathing.

Heather Shultz is a licensed acupuncturist in Marlton, NJ with advanced training in modern acupuncture techniques and traditional Asian therapies.